Wisdom and technology

A school of thought says that where technology can help rulers, it must be used. Bad decisions are a thing of the past, and the real problems that frequently happen for convenience are eliminated.

In opposition, those who claim that the use of technology results in long and often unnecessary delays, that human error is part of life and sports, and that this technology is incomplete, and therefore we must continue as we have done before. Among this group, one will find some players and referees.

To me, it appears that directed light should be the factor that the ICC is unlikely to use, common sense. First, TMO decisions must be made quickly. At the moment, there's a set schedule for steps – make sure there's no ball; check a hot spot. Check sniku. Check out hawkeye etc. TMO must really know what he needs to see, if the batsman looks, check for the ball and make a decision. Unfortunately, sometimes the technology is not the same that seems wrong, as on more than one occasion TMO looked at the incident from every possible angle within several minutes and then made a clearly ridiculous decision.

For me and some others, the hawk and the way it is used remains a problem. While phishing is made from an internal or external edge by TMO, if a contact appears on a snicko, hotspot, or runs out or stumping either inside or outside, inexplicably, lbw, if the referee only gives her outside if more than one hemisphere predicted It hawkeye to reach wicket. If given by the referee, brushing the wicket with a ball is enough to get a decision in favor of the shooter. This clearly does not make sense. Certainly, one does not use technology unless one is confident that it is completely reliable. After that, if the falcon showed that the ball was to hit the wicket and that all other conditions are ready for the success of the lbw call, then that means that it is out, regardless of the original decision of the referee.

Unfortunately, for those of us who long for "the good old days", technology exists to survive but needs to be used quickly, efficiently and with much greater common sense.

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